February 28, 2017

On April 13th, poet Myronn Hardy and novelist Carol Zoref will read as part of the Gwen Frostic Reading Series.

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February 1, 2017

Come visit New Issues at booth 741 at AWP, Washington, DC!
We’ll be hosting four book signings:

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FRIDAY

2:00-3:00 Claire Bateman
3:00-4:00 David Blair
4:00-5:00 Carol Zoref

SATURDAY
11:00-12:00 Chuck Carlise

 

January 27, 2017

2017-green-rose-prize-announcement

January 13, 2017

Looking forward to this!

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On January 15th at 4pm, multimedia artist Rachel Eliza Griffiths joins publisher Chris Jackson in the first National Sawdust+ Talk for 2017…

January 13, 2017

Enjoy a poem from Katie Peterson today from Poets.org:

January 5, 2017

Congratulations to Charles Boyer, winner of the GLCA New Writers Award for Fiction!

“Boyer reveals what it means to remain a moral human being in the face of totalitarian power and brutality. This is a novel that reminds us of the power of fiction to teach us empathy and to help us understand how precarious freedom truly is. It is a masterful novel, one that is necessary for our times.”

 

 

Read Jennifer K. Sweeney’s new poem “Poem for My Son in the Car.”

The wipers sweep two overlapping hills
POETS.ORG

January 3, 2017

“A series of intimate and captivating interviews by Rachel Zucker with poets and artists about quotidian objects, experiences or obsessions, Commonplace conversations explore the recipes, advice, lists, anecdotes, quotes, politics, phobias, spiritual practices, and other non-Literary forms of knowledge that are vital to an artist’s life and work.” Enjoy!

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Host Rachel Zucker speaks with award-winning poet Jericho Brown about the differences between poetry and journalism, the role of truth and facts in poetry, the complexities of separating a poet’s autobiography from the work especially in the…
COMMONPODCAST.COM

 

January 2, 2017

In One Version of the Story by Chuck Carlise received a great review from Publishers Weekly:
In this haunting debut, Carlise creates an ars moriendi out of the legends of L’Inconnue de la Seine, an unknown woman who drowned in the Seine River in the late 1880s—and who was immortalized…

 

October 18, 2016

Thrilled to see Sawnie Morris featured at Poets & Writers:

A roundup of new and emerging authors over the age of fifty whose debut books were published during the past year: Desiree Cooper, Sawnie Morris, Paul Vidich, Paula Whyman, and Paul Hertneky.
PW.ORG

Thursday, July 16, 2015

New Issues 20th Anniversary

Please join us for this special gathering of the Kalamazoo community, writers, and Creative Writing and English alumni to celebrate 20 years of New Issues Poetry & Prose. Featuring music, readings, and an art sale. Sunday, August 30th, 2:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m. $10 suggested donation / $5 students

Wednesday, September 17, 2014

New Issues Poet Khaled Mattawa Named 2014 MacArthur Fellow

  Congratulations, Khaled Mattawa!

From PBS: MacArthur Foundation Announces 21 New Geniuses

The 2014 MacArthur Fellows

From the LA Times:
“The poet, translator and University of Michigan professor won admiration from the MacArthur Foundation for ‘rendering the beauty and meaning of contemporary Arab poetry to an English reader and highlighting the invaluable role of literary translation in bridging cultural divides.'”

Khaled Mattawa’s most recent collection of original poetry, Tocqueville, was published by New Issues Poetry & Prose (2010).

Ecclesiastes

The trick is that you’re willing to help them.
The rule is to sound like you’re doing them a favor.

The rule is to create a commission system.
The trick is to get their number.

The trick is to make it personal:
No one in the world suffers like you.

The trick is that you’re providing a service.
The rule is to keep the conversation going.

The rule is their parents were foolish,
their children are greedy or insane.

The rule is to make them feel they’ve come too late.
The trick is that you’re willing to make exceptions.

The rule is to assume their parents abused them.
The trick is to sound like the one teacher they loved.

And when they say “too much,”
give them a plan.

And when they say “anger” or “rage” or “love,”
say “give me an example.”

The rule is everyone is a gypsy now.
Everyone is searching for his tribe.

The rule is you don’t care if they ever find it.
The trick is that they feel they can.

Khaled Mattawa was born in Benghazi, Libya in 1964 and immigrated to the U.S. in his teens. He is the author of three previous books of poetry, Ismailia Eclipse (Sheep Meadow, 1995),Zodiac of Echoes (Ausable, 2003), andAmorisco (Ausable, 2008). Mattawa has translated eight volumes of contemporary Arabic poetry and co-edited two anthologies of Arab American literature. He is currently a Chancellor for the Academy of American Poetry, and has received a Guggenheim fellowship, an NEA translation grant, the Alfred Hodder Fellowship from Princeton University, the PEN American Center Poetry Translation Prize, and three Pushcart Prizes. Mattawa teaches in the MFA (Creative Writing) Program at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.

Wednesday, April 30, 2014